Archive for October, 2005

Long-Term Buys

October 31, 2005

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Most market commentators make picks to beat the market over the next year, so it is refreshing to read a column titled Best Buys for 2015. The author mentions Home Depot (NYSE: HD), Toll Brothers (NYSE: TOL), Caterpillar (NYSE: CAT), Jean-Coutou (TSX: PJC.SV.A), CVS (NYSE: CVS), Cardinal Health (NYSE: CAH), WellPoint (NYSE: WLP), Royal Bank (TSX: RY), Investors Group (TSX: IGM), Great-West Life (TSX: GWO), Teck-Cominco (TSX: TEK.SV.B), Inco (TSX: N), Encana (TSX: ECA) and Cameco (TSX: CCO).

My picks for 2015: TD Bank (TSX: TD), Bank of Nova Scotia (TSX: BNS), Home Depot (NYSE: HD), Anheuser-Busch (NYSE: BUD) and AIG (NYSE: AIG). (FD: I own all the securities mentioned above.)

What stocks do you think will perform well over the long run? Please let me know through the comments.

My Blog is Worth How Much?

October 30, 2005

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My blog is worth $30,485.16.
How much is your blog worth?

So, how much do you think the old Canadian Capitalist blog is worth? I checked out the blog worth calculator (thanks to Jim over at Blueprint for pointing it out) and almost choked on my coffee to find that it is worth over $30,000 (at least in the dream world). FYI, I receive less than $100 each month from the Google Adsense program. Considering that as “non-GAAP earnings” (valuing the hours I put into the blog at $0), the P/E for the blog is somewhere over 35. At least, it is not as expensive as Baidu.com (NASDAQ: BIDU)!

RRSP Contributions Statistics

October 26, 2005

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Like me, many Canadians do not have a pension plan at work. So, it is critical that we make annual contributions to our RRSPs. In this context, a report released today by Statistics Canada makes grim reading:

  • While, total contributions in 2004 increased 4.5% over 2003, the median contribution remained flat at $2600.
  • Of the 87% of tax filers eligible to contribute to their RRSP, only 30% actually did.
  • Tax filers used up only 8% of their eligible contribution room.

So, why don’t we save for our retirement? This article provides some answers, but there really is no substitute for discipline. We just have to save money for what could be a very long retirement.